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Project: Early Childhood Mental Health Colorado Website

Organization: Colorado Department of Human Services–Office of Early Childhood

Location of Messaging: Statewide

 

Children’s social-emotional development begins at birth with relationships and experiences they have right from the beginning. With secure and loving relationships and positive experiences, children develop a foundation of mental health that supports them throughout their lives. For more information about this important topic and to view helpful resources please go to earlychildhoodmentalhealthCO.org. The website contains a toolkit of materials including fact sheets, videos, posters, social media content, brochures and more to help professionals learn more about social-emotional development and early childhood mental health, offer tips on how to support healthy social-emotional development in early childhood programs and support communication and outreach to families.  Materials are available in Spanish and English and can be customized for local organizations.

Collateral: all materials can be found at earlychildhoodmentalhealthCO.org

 

Project: Increasing Public Investment in Children in the Estes Valley

Organization: Estes Valley Investment in Child Success (EVICS)

Location of the Messaging: Estes Park, Colorado

The goal of this project was to increase community awareness of, and investment in, early childhood needs and services, and to build community support for a systemic approach to the provision of high-quality early childhood services.

EVICS developed a task force of community members who were trained to inundate the community with messages about the importance of strong child development and child care as the Estes Valley is experiencing issues for families trying to access quality, affordable care. The taskforce developed a PowerPoint slide deck with the support of the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership to help them in their effort to build public support. In addition, EVICS developed ads for local papers promoting their messages.

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Project: Clayton Early Learning Holiday Card

Organization: Clayton Early Learning

Location: Statewide/Online

We used shared messaging in our holiday card to promote and celebrate the notion of shared prosperity. The card is intended for a range of audiences, so we used the message of shared prosperity to recognize all stakeholders and their contributions to our work in early childhood.

Project: Shared Messaging in Grand County

Organization: Grand Beginnings

Location of Messaging: Grand and Jackson Counties

Grand Beginnings has a total of seven banners that are included on their website, each one addressing one of the primary messages in the Shared Message Bank. Clicking on one of the banners redirects to Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child for more information. The website is available to those seeking more information about Grand Beginnings, so these messages are able to reach a wide range of people.

The messaging is also included in their Early Childhood Mental Health brochure, which touches on topics such as resilience as a skill and childhood mental health. These brochures are available to parents and caregivers and are distributed on both an individual basis and through our partners in childcare, educational services, and healthcare services.

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A Call-to-Action to Support Moms, Babies and Families in May and Every Month!

May is Mental Health Month, and we know that the health and well-being of a child can be impacted by the mental health of her parents. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is supporting a statewide campaign focused on maternal mental health, specifically around pregnancy-related depression (PRD). Learn more about the campaign and how your organization can play a role in ensuring new mothers and their babies can thrive together!

by Phuonglan Nguyen, Young Child Wellness Specialist, CDPHE

The building blocks of a healthy pregnancy and birth consist of emotional and mental health as well as physical health care. The benefits of maternal wellness during and after pregnancy include a high quality of life and maternal functioning for mothers, babies being born on time and with healthy weights, strong mother-baby attachment; and healthy, happy and productive families. Good mental health in pregnant women and new mothers also promotes young children’s development, healthy social relationships, and success in school and life!

As we raise awareness about the importance of mental health and wellness during this year’s Mental Health Awareness Month, we continue to be reminded that for many expectant and new moms (and dads), the path to parenthood is neither smooth nor clear.

Pregnancy-related depression (PRD) and anxiety is the number one complication of pregnancy, affecting about one out of ten women Colorado, according to latest data from the state Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS, 2012-14). According to the National Coalition of Maternal Mental Health, more women will get a maternal mental health complication than new cases of breast cancer.

Untreated depression and anxiety can have long-lasting consequences for moms, including decreased maternal functioning, mother-child bonding, and quality of life. Between 2004-12, nearly one-third of pregnancy-associated deaths in Colorado is attributed to suicide or overdose. This dataset from the Colorado Maternal Mortality Program calls to our attention to address maternal mental health issues earlier and more often.

Consequences for children born to depressed mothers have also been well-research, ranging from babies being born early or of low birth weight, to fundamental changes in the brain development process that can affect children’s ability to grow, learn and emotionally thrive in later years. Unfortunately, these are the potential risks for the nearly 20,000 children who were born to depressed mothers in Colorado between 2012 and 2014.

But even with many proven models of prevention and intervention available today – from peer support groups and talk therapy to lifestyle changes, social supports, and in some cases, medication – many continue to be hesitant in seeking help. Barriers to treatment range from limited access to culturally and linguistically competent, mental health services; lack of consistent, standardized screening, referral and follow-up mechanisms in health and mental health care settings; and last but not least, the fear of having to admit to having a number of “socially undesirable” feelings that go beyond the “baby blues”: Profound sadness, hopelessness, guilt and shame.

Over the years, we have taken many steps in Colorado to increase our own knowledge on the prevalence of PRD, its risk and protective factors, and mechanisms to increase screening and identification for PRD. Providers and partners across the state have also developed local infrastructure, networks, and capacity to address screening, referral and treatment using locally developed and community-centered mechanisms.

But in order to make the pathway (from screening to treatment) fully accessible to new and expectant parents, we must first clear off the debris that’s currently on this path – false stereotypes, negative attitudes, and social discrimination attached to new moms and dads experiencing pregnancy-related depression and anxiety.

We must also join moms and dads in talking about the health and mental health challenges of parenthood, walking with them through a path toward support, and wrapping our arms around all new moms and dads. If you are a mom or dad, know of one, or work with one, please take a moment to look at our public awareness campaign on pregnancy-related depression and anxiety. All the materials are downloadable, free and ready to print!

Visit www.postpartum.net/colorado to find local resources and supports or call toll-free 1-800-944-4773 (available in English and Spanish, 24/7).

Want to know more on how to integrate maternal wellness and early childhood social emotional development in your work? Check out this great blog by our local partners, the Denver’s Early Childhood Council and Denver Public Health. Interested in joining the growing statewide campaign, have a story you’d like to share about PRD, or want to share what you’re doing in your community to promote maternal mental health? Click here. To receive campaign updates, click here.

 

 

Local Collaboration to Enhance Prevention Efforts Through Shared Messaging

Shirley Ritter directs Kids First, an early childhood resource center serving Pitkin County. Read her reflection on promoting local collaboration for preventive efforts and how Kids First used Early Childhood Shared Messaging as a tool to support these efforts.

by Shirley Ritter, Kids First in Pitkin County

“We live in such a beautiful place. Look at the blue sky, the aspen trees, the mountains, even the babbling rivers; what could possibly be stressful about living here?”

This is often the first response I get from community members when I begin a conversation about adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) or toxic stress. No matter where you live, we know that young children are at risk for stress, triggered by multiple sources, that can have life-long consequences. We also know that with supportive, responsive relationships, these effects can be prevented.

I’d thought about this issue, and worked with other local agencies to plan for prevention programs for children and families; our agency also provides family education based on “emotion coaching” and the work of John Gottman. It still felt like this issue was not getting the attention it deserved. When I heard about the efforts of the Early Childhood Colorado Partnership (ECCP) to share common messaging across the state, that partners have been working on positive and effective messages, and that there was a mini-grant available, I was sold.

We used the mini-grant funds to pay for a graphic artist who used beautiful pictures of children incorporated into the shared messages developed by ECCP and stakeholders, who by the way know a considerable amount more about this topic than do I! The shared messaging having to do with children who thrive, about prosperity, and about resilience really resonates with families. I am writing this in the hope others might be inspired by have done in other communities; that we will all approach families in a way that shows we understand. Toxic stress is described as prolonged adversity, such as physical or emotional abuse, chronic neglect, caregiver substance abuse or mental illness, exposure to violence, and/or the accumulated burdens of family economic hardship—without adequate adult support. In addition to the ECCP, there is a wealth of information at Center for the Developing Child at Harvard to help you understand and convey important information about what children need to thrive.

Our next steps included adding a page to our website with basic information, local resources, and websites with helpful information for families. We used the materials we developed on social media, local newspaper advertising, and on our website.

I asked our local partners that serve children, youth and families to link to our webpage and share our message on their social media. There seems to heightened awareness lately for prevention programs, but not everyone knows just how young that starts, or exactly what that could look like. I am a big believer in collaboration, and this effort has reinforced that for me, and given us all so many ways to paint the picture of what it looks like for kids to thrive in our communities, and our state! Let me know what you’ve found to be successful so we can continue to share in this success.

Reach out to Shirley at shirley.ritter@cityofaspen.com

Project: 9 Ways to Grow Healthy Colorado Kids

Organization: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment — Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Unit

Location of Messaging: Statewide

Speaking With One Voice are nine audience-tested early childhood obesity prevention messages and supporting content to address important healthy lifestyle behaviors found most promising in preventing overweight and obesity before it begins among Colorado’s youngest children. The goal of the initiative is to ensure pregnant women and families with infants and young children hear consistent messages in multiple settings where they spend time and interact with community members that potentially influence health behaviors.

Since 2015, the 9 Ways to Grow Healthy Colorado Kids messages are being used statewide by diverse partner organizations including public health and primary care clinics, WIC Programs, hospitals, early child care homes and centers, recreation centers, libraries and others. No cost messaging materials are available at www.colorado.gov/cdphe/9-ways-grow-healthy-colorado-kids or simply search on One Stop ECOP Shop. Resources include downloadable posters and handouts, provider talking points, newsletter templates, social media guide, messaging video, an electronic form to order materials and more!

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Unit invites you to join this statewide effort in sharing these messages and supporting rationale and tips in your counseling, education, and community messaging promotion efforts. We maximize messaging when all public health programs, health care providers, early care and education professionals and other partners work together to deliver consistent, accurate and consumer-tested messages. Together, we can make a greater impact!

Project: LAUNCH Together

Organization: Early Milestones Colorado

Location of Messaging: Statewide

LAUNCH Together video: developed to communicate the importance of early childhood mental health and how coordinated, community-based, family-centered prevention strategies (integration of behavioral health into primary care, early childhood mental health consultation in early care and ed programs, enhanced home visitation, screening and assessment, and family strengthening) can improve child and family outcomes.

Project: Kids First

Organization: City of Aspen — Kids First

Location of messaging: Pitkin County

We have used social media and PSA’s to draw attention to this issue. We have also created a page on our website titled “Kids Thrive” and have asked other local service agencies to link to this page. This page continues the message, but also has information about local health and mental health resources and services – http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Departments/Kids-First/Kids-Thrive/. We will use some print and digital advertising to support this message.

 

Collateral Materials (click each to access): 

Focus on What Matters Most

A Strong Foundation Begins Early

A Strong Foundation Begins Early 2

Help Kids Grow Positively

Help Kids Grow Positively 2

We Thrive When Our Kids Thrive

We Thrive When Our Kids Thrive 2

Project: Earlier Is Easier

Organization: Earlier is Easier

Location of Messaging: Denver-Metro Area

 

Earlier Is Easier is a collaborative of 28 Denver-area organizations working collectively to promote the value of interacting with children from birth to age three. Our messaging encourages simple activities related to talking, reading, singing, playing, laughing and writing that parents and caregivers can do each day to foster healthy brain development while also building strong emotional bonds.

We have two websites, that were just redesigned: www.EarlierIsEasier.org and www.Espanol-EIE.org. Both sites include age-based tips and activities, information about the science of building healthy brains, local community resources and more. We also have printed “tip cards” that are distributed on child-friendly plastic rings via our partner organizations, community programs and at a variety of events.

EIE’s websites and tip cards underwent content and language revisions in 2016 to incorporate messaging from the shared message bank. We connected our existing learning messaging in many places to activities and concepts that also foster social emotional health and building positive relationships. Some examples include: promoting serve and return communication; strengthening relationships through shared play and laughter, and encouraging activities that involve meaningful interactions between parent/caregiver and child.

 

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